Live from Davos

Hi! I’m starting my blog. Currently at Davos, at The World Economic Forum. Its my first time, however I came with an agenda that my team and I picked as the central focal point for all our projects. Food security. Which as it turns out is one of the key topics of the WEF.

I gave an interview to Hong Kong's Phoenix TV

Now I’m preparing for Life’s Digital Disruption – a debate which touches on all of our lives. I will talk about food security within the framework of the current situation and how relevant it will be in the years to come.

The main question is – how do we provide quality food to 8.5 Billion people in 2050 in a sustainable manner? Is 8.5 billion the limit? If not, what other scenarios are possible? The sustainable development and food security topic, on a global level is the topic on everyone’s mind.

How do we provide quality food to 8.5 Billion people in 2050 in a sustainable manner?

If you take Maslow’s Hierarchy and other concepts of human needs, you can easily single out several levels on which people can be brought together. The first level is the physical requirements – including food. The food topic is universal. It can unite humanity. Food preparation is an ancient element of human culture, a universal cultural detail. The quantity and quality of food impacts health, including reproduction of human kind, affecting demographics and as a result the future of the economy.

The requirement of food is a basic biological requirement, common for everyone, independent of age, race and religion. Today food can become a mechanism uniting humanity and providing solutions for demographic development.

Population growth and dynamics influence the future of the global economy and humanity as a whole. Perhaps one of the most famous projections for the growth of the population, are those introduced by the UN. Based on them we saw the introduction of the global concept of food security by WHO. All of these concepts are based on the concept by Sergei Kapitsa, according to which the hyperbolic growth of the population will reach 11.36 billion and will stabilize, at which point population growth will cease.

Based on his theory, global demographic transition, accompanied by rapid changes in the speed of population growth will lead to significant changes human development.
We know that Kapitsa was looking for a logical basis for the hyperbolic growth of the population, and found it in the relationship between historical events and growing connectivity of humanity. However, the fact that growth had slowed in the second half of the last century, lead to certain inconsistencies in his theories.

Population growth and dynamics influence the future of the global economy and humanity as a whole.

Today, the entire concept of food security and sustainability is based on Kapitsa’s rather incorrect hypothesis. However, he is not alone in offering a vision for the future. We can speak of three possible key scenarios of demographic growth, each of which requires its own food security strategy.

  • Endless population growth;
  • Stabilizing population numbers;
  • Reduction in population.
Today, the entire concept of food security and sustainability is based on Kapitsa’s rather incorrect hypothesis.

The continuing development of new technologies and the latest scientific achievements, lead to fundamentally new approaches to food production, changing consumption patterns. We are already discussing smart food, therapeutic food and superfoods. We are seeing a huge amount of innovation that opens up new possibilities for sustainable food safety and food security.

In my opinion, development of the economy and food industry as a whole, can be sustainable, only if we take into account the social and environmental effects: capital has to be invested for the good of all, viewed as impact investment. This is the route we have chosen.

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